Mabie Todd Swan Visofil VT340/76

One of these days I may own a Visofil, an ambition yet to be fulfilled. These photos are kindly supplied by Jens. This is the very beautiful green and silver /76 pattern. This later, VT version of the Visofil comes in several candy stripe patterns.

The first version of the Visofil, introduced in 1935, is the easier to repair. It is Swan’s answer to the fashion for ink-in-the-barrel pens with ink viewing windows.

In 1937 Mabie Todd brought out an entirely new version of the Visofil and unfortunately little consideration was given to servicing. Perhaps it is enough to say that it takes four pages in the Marshall & Oldfield repair book to describe servicing this pen.

Repair, then, is not for the faint-hearted but there are a few very skilled and experienced repairers who will take on this work. I’m not one of them, I hasten to add!

3 thoughts on “Mabie Todd Swan Visofil VT340/76

  1. Deb, I agree , they are a beautiful pen………but me personally, I’m a bit of an adherent to the K.I.S.S. system , and do fail to see why a filling system needs to be quite so complicated, just to add a bit more ink.
    It’s hardly a gruelling task to fill a lever fill once or twice more.
    Given that it’s quite common to see the pressure spring in the barrel end/ blind cap (?)
    of a glass cartridge pen get rusted out, one wonders if the spring in these Visofil pens suffered a similar fate !?

    1. I don’t know the answer to your question, Rob, because I have never worked on these pens. I agree about keeping it simple. There was a craze for novelty in the thirties and British pens became infected, though not to the same extent as the US. One could make a list of complicated filling systems we could do well without.

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